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Working with a Recruiter

Working with a recruiter can save you time and often introduce you to jobs which have not yet been publicly advertised. Recruiters maintain your confidentiality while guiding you through the process. They help you discover the pros and cons of the practice and geographic area as well as assist you with contract negotiations. To maximize your working relationship, the following is suggested:

  • Provide a current Curriculum Vitae, credentials and references (when requested) that are complete and factual.
  • Keep track of recruiters' names, firms and the names and location of the opportunities they represent.
  • Require that your Curriculum Vitae and credentials be referred only with your permission.
  • Ask recruiters to present accurate and complete information regarding practice opportunities.
  • Accurately discuss your motivation for relocation and be specific about your geographic preferences.
  • Provide current income and future income expectations.
  • Provide information about special needs for children, schools, housing, spouse or partner's employment, etc.
  • Provide the current status of your search.
  • Acknowledge whether your credentials have already been presented to the recruiter's client.
  • Provide honest information about National Practitioner Databank reports, lawsuits, privilege or licensure suspension or revocations, or any other issue which may affect your candidacy.
  • Be prepared to cooperate with appropriate parties, when asked, by acknowledging which Recruiter referred you to the position in question, including which recruiter set up the interview and assisted with interview arrangements.
  • Keep in touch with your recruiter(s) in a timely manner.
  • Provide timely and complete feedback regarding interviews to both the recruiter and your potential employer.
  • Allow your recruiter to use his or her expertise to assist with contract negotiations.

Interviewing Tips

Working with a recruiter can save you time and often introduce you to jobs which have not yet been publicly advertised. Recruiters maintain your confidentiality while guiding you through the process. They help you discover the pros and cons of the practice and geographic area as well as assist you with contract negotiations. To maximize your working relationship, the following is suggested:

  1. Dress in a professional and appropriate manner.
  2. Confirm the visit.
  3. Get directions and appropriate contact numbers.
  4. Learn about the location and practice prior to visiting.
  5. Be polite and acknowledge everyone, especially staff.
  6. Do not chew gum, but be sure to have fresh breath.
  7. Be yourself.
  8. Be upbeat and attentive.
  9. Do not wear strong cologne or perfume.
  10. Answer questions thoroughly.
  11. Do not over-talk or answer questions before the questioner has finished.
  12. Bring copies of your Curriculum Vitae and references.
  13. Bring your spouse or partner (if appropriate).
  14. Do not treat the visit as a vacation.
  15. Do not add unnecessary expenses to your visit expenses.
  16. Discuss income guarantee, salary and bonus as appropriate.
  17. Express your interest (if appropriate).
  18. Write thank you notes to all promptly.

Identifying an Employment Attorney

How to Identify A Healthcare Labor and Employment Attorney:

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Writing Your CV Cover Letter

The cover letter to your Curriculum Vitae is your potential employer’s first impression of you – make it a good one!

  1. Keep your letter brief.
  2. Proofread carefully.
  3. State whether you are practicing or in training.
  4. State if you are responding to advertising or an internet job posting.
  5. State if your job search is confidential.
  6. State when you are available.
  7. State if you have “ties” to the area or other reason for relocation.
  8. Explain Curriculum Vitae gaps.
  9. Explain any visa waiver requirements (if applicable).
  10. Mention any specialty training that would make your candidacy more desirable.
  11. Include your contact information.
  12. Do not hesitate to get professional writing and editing help if necessary.
  13. Use white or ecru resume paper.

Curriculum Vitae Template

Click here to download the template

CONTACT INFORMATION
Name
Address
Home Telephone
Work Telephone (if possible)
Cell Phone
E-mail





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How to Choose and Work with a Recruiting Firm

HOW DO I CHOOSE A SEARCH FIRM?

What’s the difference between contingency and retainer firms?

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Why Work with a NAPR Recruiter

The NAPR, in existence for over 30 years, is the only international organization whose membership includes traditional physician search firms, in-house hospital recruiters, physician groups, contract staffing, advanced practice clinicians recruiting firms, locum tenens’ organizations, and other physician employers.  Our diverse membership is unified by these characteristics:

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Types of Malpractice Insurance

There are two basic types of malpractice insurance: "claims-made" and "occurrence-made".

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State Medical Licensure Boards

In this section you will find some standard Boards of medicine and other groups that might help you in your research.  NAPR hopes these resources are useful and if you have any other suggestions to include in this section, please send those suggestions to [email protected].

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State Medical Societies

In this section you will find some standard Boards of medicine and other groups that might help you in your research.  NAPR hopes these resources are useful and if you have any other suggestions to include in this section, please send those suggestions to [email protected].

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National Board of Medical Examiners

The NBME, founded in 1915, is an independent, not-for-profit organization that provides examinations for the health professions. It was founded in 1915 because of the need for a voluntary, nationwide examination which medical licensing authorities could accept as the standard by which to judge candidates for medical licensure.

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National Board of Osteopathic Examiners

The National Board of Osteopathic Medical Examiners is a non-profit corporation which administering examinations testing the medical knowledge of osteopathic physicians.

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The Federation of State Medical Boards

The Federation of State Medical Boards represents the 70 state medical and osteopathic regulatory boardscommonly referred to as state medical boardswithin the United States, its territories and the District of Columbia. It supports its member boards as they fulfill their mandate of protecting the public’s health, safety and welfare through the proper licensing, disciplining, and regulation of physicians and, in most jurisdictions, other health care professionals.

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American Board of Medical Specialties

The American Board of Medical Specialties ABMS),was established in 1933 is a not-for-profit organization.  It comprises 24 medical specialty Member Boards, which oversees the certification of physician specialists in the United States.

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Special Purpose Exam (SPEX)

The SPEX is a one-day, computer-administered examination consisting of eight blocks (50 questions in each block) which is administered by the Federation of State Medical Boards of the United States, Inc.

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Association of American Medical Colleges

The AAMC, Founded in 1876, is a not-for-profit entity representing:

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The American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine (AACOM)

The American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine (AACOM) was founded in 1898 to lend support and assistance to the nation's osteopathic medical schools, and to serve as a unifying voice for osteopathic medical education. 

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United States Medical License Exam

In the United States and its territories, the individual state medical boards grant licenses to practice medicine. Each medical board sets its own rules and regulations and requires passing an examination, the USMLE, that demonstrates qualification for licensure.

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Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)

The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education established in 1981, is a private, non-profit entity which evaluates and accredits all United States’ medical residency programs.

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Education Commission for Foreign Medical Graduates

ECFMG is a world leader in promoting quality health care—serving physicians, members of the medical education and regulatory communities, health care consumers, and those researching issues in medical education and health workforce planning.

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